heart disease

South Carolina — Despite having lower amounts of coronary artery calcification, African Americans are at increased risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular events compared with Caucasians. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, S.C. suggests that increased levels of non-calcified plaque, which consists of buildups of soft deposits deep in […]

According to the American Heart Association, one in three adults in the United States has high blood pressure, the rate is higher in African Americans. Find out if you're at risk here.

Do you have any idea what keeps your hear ticking as it should? Check out some amazing and little known facts about your heart here.

Women who eat more white bread, white rice, pizza, and other carbohydrate-rich foods that cause blood sugar to spike are more than twice as likely to develop heart disease than women who eat less of those foods, a new study suggests.

"While people know stress plays a role in how they feel physically, they're often unaware that it is a risk factor for heart disease," says Suzanne Steinbaum, MD, an attending cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Processed meats may increase a person's risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to research conducted at Harvard University. See what the findings of the study were and how you can take steps to help prevent these diseases.

Yes. Among all U.S. women who die each year, one in four dies of heart disease. In 2004, nearly 60 percent more women died of cardiovascular disease (both heart disease and stroke) than from all cancers combined. The older a woman gets, the more likely she is to get heart disease. But women of all ages should be concerned about heart disease. All women should take steps to prevent heart disease.